Recent Camera and Photography Articles


This page points to all recent articles published on dslrbodies.com, sansmirror.com, gearophile.com, and filmbodies.com, and is updated as new articles appear (most recent on top). For articles from previous months, check the Articles Index Archive. 

As usual when the site is inactive for a bit, it simply means that I’m so far out in the wilds that I don’t have Internet access. I noted in the Viewfinder Hours article that I’d be putting a few of those in, and I did just that, logging a bit over 80 viewfinder hours with four different cameras. I’ll have much more to say about that later in the month. 


April 16, 2014          

Its the Focus Nikon Should Focus On. When you’re offline for a couple of weeks as I’ve been, you get the chance to process information without the constant ping of new data points arriving at your senses. Here’s what struck me after being Internet free while shooting for two weeks. Article on dslrbodies.com.

 
Help support this site by starting your B&H purchases from any one of the B&H ads or links you see, or by starting an Amazon.com purchase from one of the links on this page.


April 15, 2014          

Nikon Software Updates. Capture NX2 and ViewNX2 were updated, but not Capture NX-D ;~) Article on dslrbodies.com.


April 10, 2014          

The DX Zooms Keep Coming. Nikon has announced a new version of the 18-300mm DX lens. Article on dslrbodies.com. Data page for lens.

Nikon J4 Announced (But Not for US). Nikon announced the latest update to their basic mirrorless camera. Article on sansmirror.com. Data page for camera.


April 7, 2014          

Adobe Updates Include Lightroom Mobile. Adobe announced a new member of the Creative Cloud bundle. Article on dslrbodies.com.


April 6, 2014          

Sony A7s Surprise at NAB. Sony adds a third A7 to their lineup. Article on sansmirror.com. Data page for camera.


March 28, 2014          

Apology and Clear Statement. Nikon today issued a tersely worded statement about the ongoing D600 issue. Article on dslrbodies.com.

Binocular Vision. HTC introduced the HTC One (M8) this past week, and there’s been a lot of discussion about it’s camera, which is different than other smartphone cameras. Article on gearophile.com.


March 26, 2014          

Viewfinder Hours. Back in my days running Backpacker magazine, we had an “authenticity” metric that we developed and practiced. I think it’s time for that here in the photography arena, as well. Article on dslrbodies.com.

Grass is Always Greener Syndrome. There’s a lot of “grass is always greener on the other side of the fence” going on in people’s minds these days. Article on dslrbodies.com.

Reminder: Nikon’s lens rebates go away at the end of this week. I do not expect them to be renewed for April. Why? Because March 31 is the end of Nikon’s fiscal year. Traditionally, Nikon has not been aggressive about discounting early in their fiscal year. Instead, they’re aggressive just before the end of their fiscal year, which is why we have so many rebates active at the moment. So if you’re thinking about getting one of those discounted lenses, make up your mind soon. You can help this site by ordering from the following advertiser:

bhnikonlensbanner.jpg

I expect most of the DSLR instant rebates to continue into April, by the way. Indeed, we may see a few new ones as Nikon completes their year-end inventory this week and decides they need to be more aggressive with certain cameras.


March 24, 2014          

Whats Your Biggest Problem? Today it’s time for you to come clean. You’ll need to do some soul searching and honest evaluation. It will be rough. Your ego will be bruised. If that worries you, just stop reading now. Article on dslrbodies.com.

Was it Announced or Not? Article on sansmirror.com.


Previous articles can be found in the Articles Index.


Thom's Monthly Teaching Point — Exaggeration of Human Form

INT CHILE Santiago-Jumper.jpg

While I was cleaning up some files, I came across a fairly poor scan of this old film image, but since it illustrates something I want to write about, I decided to use it despite the lower quality than I typically want to use. 

There should be something very, very obvious about this shot. That’s a human in the upper left corner. Unmistakeable. 

Why?

Because it has two legs, two arms, and a head, and it’s moving on two legs. Humans are the only mammal that stays on two legs for long. The teaching point here is about exaggeration. If you look at almost any photo that has a human in it, they are standing straight up, arms at sides, legs together. Basically a big blob of shape, with nothing human about it. Of course, much of the time you can still tells it’s human because the exposure shows a face and you focused on the eyes. (You did focus on the eyes, right?) 

When you place figures in landscapes, or in front of monuments, and especially when you’re dealing with silhouettes, pose exaggeration is something you should consider imperative. Imagine if the human in this shot was just standing facing me. They might look just another jut of the rock. Unless. Unless I got them to separate their legs, unless I got them to get their arms away from their body. 

Note also that this particular human silhouette invokes motion across the frame. That was actually what I was looking for. The slightly slow shutter speed (1/15) also gives them less than sharp edges, adding to the motion impact. 

It’s nearly impossible to put too much exaggeration in to poses in silhouette like this (and even in front lit ones, too). While the subject may feel awkward, the flattening effect of a print needs all the help it can get to put energy into the human form. 

Short version: never let a subject pose directly at you, arms at their side, legs together. Never. Put them at a slight diagonal, get them to put some space between their legs and between their torso and body. Let them ham it up. Tell them that they’re Superman about to take off, Spiderman about to jump, that they’re about to encounter a hurdle in a race, anything to get them to do something other than just stand there. 


If you're wondering where the previous Teaching Points went, they're here.


© Thom Hogan 2014 — All Rights Reserved