Day 12 — Driving Chobe

August 28

Water is life in the wild. So where there's lots of permanent water, there's lots of wildlife. 

The Chobe River is one of those big permanent water sources, and the heart of Chobe National Park sits adjacent to it. 

Botswana doesn't have much of what you can call migrations, but elephants, for example, do move large distances across the country as the water supply allows them. They really want to be in the mopane forests and better food sources in the middle of the country hundreds of kilometers away, but as water supplies dry up there after the wet season ends, they work there way back to the permanent water sources. Water is life. 

Our main path in this part of the park is a double track right along the edge of the flood margins on the river. You pretty much find everything in this area, so let's just let the pictures do the talking:

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To say that we had a good drive in Chobe is an understatement. I saw a lot of great shots from the students, and everyone was pretty much shooting away at this point. Chatter between the vehicles was even pretty quiet, as everyone was pretty much satisfied with what they had in their viewfinder.

Chobe is a great place to end our wildlife drives. Water is life. And life is great shooting. 

But we're not quite done with Chobe and the water yet. We've got one more twist scheduled for this afternoon, which I'll get to in the next blog post. 

© Thom Hogan 2014 — All Rights Reserved